Yesterday in German Township

July 15, 2010

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No longer standing, this house at 5219 Germantown Avenue was owned by the Bringhurst family in the latter 1700s; it is known as the Jungkurth House. Both were carriage builders, and Jungkurth built ambulances during the Civil War. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This photograph shows a springhouse and dwelling on Cresheim Road leading down to Cresheim Creek. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”





The Toland House at 4810 Germantown Avenue was built by George Toland in 1734 and was gone by 1925. British officers were quartered there before the Battle of Germantown in 1777. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This house, today in Vernon Park, was built by James Matthews in 1803. John Wister bought the house in 1812 and named it Vernon after George Washington’s Mt. Vernon. It was bought by the city and used as a library from 1989 until 1907. Today it houses the Central Germantown Council. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This house, which stood at 6205 Germantown Avenue, was built by Dirck Keyser before 1715. It was known as the Keyser-Channon House because it was inherited by a Keyser niece who married John  Channon. The site is now a parking lot. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”


The Engle House at 5938 Germantown Avenue, shown here in 1890, was built in 1758 by Benjamin Engle. It was moved back from the Avenue in 1905 to allow stores to be built and then was demolished about 1956 to provide a parking lot. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”






The Mennonite Meeting House at 6119 Germantown Avenue of the first Mennonite congregation in America was built in 1770 as a replacement for a log meeting house that was built in 1708. It is shown here as it was in the 1870s. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




The Lovett Memorial Library, Germantown Avenue at Sedgwick Street, was founded as a private library in 1885 and became a branch of the Free Library in 1924. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.




The Church of the Brethren, the mother church in this country, was organized in 1723. The stone church at the front of this building at 6611 Germantown Avenue was built in 1770. The addition behind was dedicated in 1897 and a later addition was added in 1915. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




The Lovett Memorial Library, Germantown Avenue at Sedgwick Street, was founded in 1885, making this year its 125th anniversary. Shown is the reading room (today the meeting room) around 1889. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”





This steam locomotive, pulling commuter coaches in the snow, stands at the Wister Station of the Reading Railroad about 1900. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




(Top left) This is how the north side of Herman Street in the first block east of Germantown Avenue looked in 1897. Bottom left, are the houses today. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”





An example of how our major roads once were: this is a view of Stenton Avenue north of Washington Lane in 1902. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”



Shown is a gazebo along a bridle path in the Wissahickon opposite Rittenhouse Street around 1900. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




Shown is Wissahickon Drive opposite te Monastery after a snowstorm in 1902. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




Meehan’s Nursery extended from Chew Avenue eastward to County Line Road (now Stenton Avenue) where this sign stood in 1902. The office was at Church Street (now Phil-Ellena Street) and Chew Avenue. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This tablet was placed in the wall of the Henry Hill house, (later known as Carlton) at Midvale Avenue and Stokeley Street. Washington stayed there before the British occupied Philadelphia, which led to the Battle of Germantown in 1777. The house was permanently “RUIND” in the 1950s. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This carriage is traveling along Wissahickon Drive opposite Indian Rock around 1902. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




These falls on Cresheim Creek around 1901 appear to have been created by a dam that had probably been used for one of the mills that were along the creek. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This photograph, taken around 1900, shows the building (no longer standing) on Morton Street above Haines Street as the Morton Street Day Nursery. It had been the mission of St. Michael’s Protestant Episcopal Church (which explains the look of the windows), which sold it around 1885. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This house still stands beside Grumblethorpe (seen in the background) at 5269 Germantown Avenue. Anthony Gilbert, a blacksmith, lived there in 1809. After his death in 1817 it was the residence of his son Charles. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




This is the Gorgas house at 6901 Germantown Avenue about 1900. Still standing, it is used today as a real estate office. “Yesterday in the German Township” is presented in conjunction with the Germantown Historical Society to give a look back at the way life was once lived in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, the old “German Township.”




 

Germantown Historical Society Photographs


Pictures on This Page


Archived Pictures


Jungkurth House


Springhouse and Dwelling near Chresheim Creek


Toland House


Vernon House


Keyser-Channon House


Engle House


Mennonite Meeting House


Lovett Memorial Library


Church of the Brethren


Lovett Library Reading Room


Steam Locomotive

at Wister Station


Herman Street: 1897 and 2010


Stenton Avenue at

Washington Lane


Wissahickon Gazebo at Rittenhouse Street


Wissahickon (Forbidden) Drive in the Snow


Meehan’s Nursery


Henry Hill House Plaque


Wissahickon Drive


Cresheim Creek Falls


Morton Street House,

above Haines


Anthony Gilbert,

blacksmith house


Gorgas House